How We Get Our Skin Color Interactive

This interactive animation about the biology of skin color provides stop points at which students can further explore the material through additional text and illustrations, videos, questions, and simple interactive widgets.

Narrated by the world’s leading authority on the evolution of human skin color, Dr. Nina Jablonski, this animation describes how and where melanin is produced in our cells and what factors affect our skin color.

A3MG provided interface design, graphic design, and the programming of this custom interactive video app.

Client: Howard Hughes Medical Institute

View the Interactive Animation

Interactive Video with Quiz

Interactive Video 1Interactive Video 2

A3MG designed and programmed this custom video player that features interactive quizzes for HHMI BioInteractive short films.

Embedded quiz modules test students’ understanding as they watch the short film on the rock pocket mouse—a living example of Darwin’s process of natural selection.

Pocket Mouse Film With Quiz

Lizard Evolution Virtual Lab

lizard xraylizard dewlap

The Lizard Evolution Virtual Lab was developed by a team of scientists, educators, graphic artists, and film makers to explore the evolution of the anole lizards in the Caribbean.  A3MG provided interface design and graphics as well as the programming of BioInteractive’s latest virtual lab.

The virtual lab includes four modules that investigate different concepts in evolutionary biology, including adaptation, convergent evolution, phylogenetic analysis, reproductive isolation, and speciation. Each module involves data collection, calculations, analysis and answering questions.

Exploring Transitional Fossils

GTI 3GTI 2

A3MG designed and programmed this Web app for HHMI’s BioInteractive.  Users press fossils of transitional creatures in the rock layers to reveal their characteristics and learn how each characteristic evolved.

The fossils of transitional creatures were key evidence for Darwin’s evolutionary theory, but none had been found when he published On the Origin of Species. Now, there are many examples of such fossils, which clearly show that big evolutionary leaps consist of many smaller steps.